The Trans Cambrian Way – Day Two – Attack of the Pirate

Bikepacking

Bikepacking

The day started well with an amazing cooked breakfast at the B&B, much better than a improvised meal we would have made if we had camped out. Think I may be getting soft. Our plan for the day was to ride to our friend Anna’s house to again avoid the horrendous weather. We were also going to pick up Ian today at the farm he lives on near Devils Bridge. This was a slight detour off the course but nothing too bad. We reckoned we could get to the farm for lunch and to Anna’s by the end of the day. Continue reading

The Trans Cambrian Way – Prep and Day One

IMG_2273The Cambrian Way crosses Wales from the English border at Knighton to the coast near Aberystwyth. On paper it seems like a pretty easy trip with only 103 miles to its name. However its 10,656 feet of climbing will start to give you an idea of the experience. Anyway I’ll come back to the ride itself later. Continue reading

Bikepacking the Trans Nevada (Sierra Nevada Mountains, Spain)

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Following a very successful albeit lonely trip across Portugal and Spain in 2015 (see the stories on the Camino Santiago), the bug had set in and I really wanted to ride some more in the sun. Thankfully over the years many amazing friends who are also riders have come into my life. This obviously led to planning a new ride however this time not on my own.

In late 2015 the idea for the next trip began to formulate. Using the excellent site bikepacking.com, the route was chosen for its length, height, heat and sheer beauty. This route was of course as the tile says, the Trans Nevada in Spain.

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Bikepacking the Camino Portugal – Day 6: Villa du Conde – Ponte de Lima – 47.5mi 2,648ft

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Evil lampposts & Beautiful Bridge

After having a shower in the run down holiday camp showers (pure luxury!) I had to find my way back to the Camino since I had veered off the route to get to the beach. It was easy to find again but me being me I almost instantly went the wrong way and headed down the coastal route instead. Once realising the error it meant a 20k backtrack to the days route. Me getting lost or going the wrong way seemed to be as common as the yellow arrows pointing the right way. Clearly I had developed the skill of not seeing yellow anymore seriously the trail couldn’t be easier to follow so please don’t think its hard, I’m just useless. Continue reading

Bikepacking the Camino Portugal – Day 5: Oliveira de Azemeis – Porto & Villa du Conde – 49.9mi 2,838ft

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Today I was focused as Porto and the beach were so close and all I wanted was swim in the sea and drink beer. Therefore I put my foot down to get there as soon as possible. Stu and Helen prior to the trip had told me about a campsite next to the beach in Villa du Conde that was to be my final destination of the day. However I don’t think I found the right one, unless a crowded rundown holiday camp was the correct place. Continue reading

Bikepacking the Camino Portugal – Day 4: Coimbra to Oliveira de Azemeis – 57.4mi 3,655ft

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Although uneventful, today had a few moments of delight with glorious views, sweeping rivers and cobbled streets. I didn’t take so many pictures although probably should have done.

About halfway today, I came across a beautiful river, amazing bridge and a large pond full of weed. On this pond an old man was piloting a large red weed remover/dredger to clear it out. It of course was a beautiful place to stop and have a break. However just before you reach this lovely spot, you cross over a main road into I guess the car park for here. On the side of the road was a tall, high-heeled lady wearing a very small red leather skirt. Continue reading

Jimbo’s Blog: Tour Divide, the start of it all

The Great Divide Route is the world’s longest off-pavement cycling route, it covers 2745 miles. The route is highlighted by long dirt roads and jeep trails that wend their way through forgotten passes of the Continental Divide. It travels through Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, and the United States of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. By route’s end a thru-rider will climb nearly 200,000 feet of vertical (equivalent to summiting Mount Everest from sea-level 7 times).

Great Divide Mountain Bike Route

Great Divide Mountain Bike Route

In June 2016 I will be riding the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route with my son Tom.

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